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Lord Damien

Last One to Post Wins (Part IX)

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Well then I see how it is

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Actually I don't think u do. :P

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Time to win again.

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Smart covering the post with another thread game.

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俺が勝った。

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勝ちませんでした。

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それはうそだよ。俺が本当に勝ったんだぞ。

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-_- don't feel like translating

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Googleにて翻訳出来ます。でも機械翻訳は屡間違います。それでは機械翻訳からコピーしない方がいいです。

 

それはうそだよ。俺が本当に勝ったんだぞ。

「んだぞ」は何ですか。

 

また、今勝っています。

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お前の意味がさっぱり分からない。バカじゃないか?最初にちゃんと日本語を勉強しろ。そのあと、ここに帰れるぞ。今俺が勝った。分かった、バカ?

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いいの

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お前の意味がさっぱり分からない。バカじゃないか?最初にちゃんと日本語を勉強しろ。そのあと、ここに帰れるぞ。今俺が勝った。分かった、バカ?

読んで痛いです。機械翻訳しましたか。

 

I was not aware that asking a single question meant I was stupid. The んだぞ makes zero sense where it was, especially after an already fully conjugated verb (勝つ). I cannot even begin to guess what it is supposed to be, as there are no words or particles that I am aware of that start with just a ん. Maybe a dialect thing? Further, if だ is supposed to be the short form of です, that makes even less sense, as you do not directly follow verbs with です... ever? If there are exceptions or んだぞ actually means something, I want to know. That is why I asked in the first place. I am still learning afterall.

 

 

Also, I think I will offer non-machine translation of Aurelius' last post as is:

お前の意味がさっぱり分からない。

You do not understand the "meaning of you."

バカじゃないか?

You are not stupid?

最初にちゃんと日本語を勉強しろ。

First, study white properly Japanese langauge. (Not a single verb, yet there is a particle indicating "study" should have been it.)

Further: First, study (noun form, though preceeded by particle for an action verb) white (probably a typo or some machine translation bollocks, maybe wanted する instead of しろ to make this sentence "do" something, i.e. have a verb in it) properly (or maybe "clearly" or "straight" makes more sense than "properly"?) Japanese language.

そのあと、ここに帰れるぞ。

Afterwards, return here.

今俺が勝った。

Now I win.

分かった、バカ?

Do you understand, idiot?

 

 

I only understand what I see. If you meant something else, maybe you should have put it there. Or, if relying on machine translation, stop. I spend time looking through an actual book for words or parts of sentences I do not understand, and spend time looking though another book to look up Chinese letters I do not yet know. When those fail, or I am without, I have some dictionaries on my phone. I am not machine-translating in either direction, and I would rather not waste time reading something that came from garbage machines.

 

 

Err, OK. Sorry for the misunderstanding but I was only joking.

 

Explanatory の can be shortened to ん. It has a similar meaning to わけ, which also has an explanatory tone to it. の and わけ are nouns, and therefore the copula だ can be attached to it. In the original, I used it in the sense of explaining to you that I still had won. "See, I won?"

 

お前の意味がさっぱり分からない means "I don't understand your meaning at all" (you forgot to translate さっぱり). Also, you're translating far too literally. There are many cases where の is used broadly. For instance, if you wanted to say, "The boy who is a student is a good child", you can translate that as, 「生徒の男の子はよい子です」 or even 「生徒である男の子はよい子です]. In this case, the の is acting as a relative pronoun, rather than denoting strict "possession".

 

「バカじゃないか」 means, "You're an idiot, aren't you?" Rhetorical question.

 

しろ is the imperative of する、so the sentence 「最初に日本語をちゃんと勉強しろ」 means, "Study Japanese properly first!"

 

「そのあとここに帰れる」 means, "Afterwards, you can return here." In other words, it's the potential mood of the verb and not an imperative. If I wanted to order you to return here, I could say, 「ここに帰ってくれ!」or 「ここに帰れ!」or「ここに帰りなさい!」or 「ここに帰ってくれませんか?」, etc.

 

とこれで、あなたが負けましたが、私は勝ちました。("By the way, you've lost and I've won.")

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Neva shall I lose

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Neva shall I lose

 

Oh rly?

 

 

149230_391036410994172_1238412906_n.jpg

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Neva shall I lose

 

 

Oh rly?

 

 

149230_391036410994172_1238412906_n.jpg

Yea rly

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Oh no you didnt :(

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.

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*Four years  since his last post* 

 

I shall win!

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I am new and let me win! :tongue:

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K dawg's back in the house!

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:OMGOSH: oh my goodness, oh my goodness, oh my goodness...I've posted.

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